21.9.17

Swiss scholars locate lost ancient Temple of Artemis on Greek island of Evia (video)

Like most of the Greek islands, Euboea was originally known under other names in Antiquity, such as Macris (Μάκρις) and Doliche (Δολίχη) from its elongated shape, or Ellopia, Aonia and Abantis from the tribes inhabiting it. Its ancient and current name, Εὔβοια, derives from the words εὖ "good", and βοῦς "ox", meaning "the land of the well-fed oxen".

A Swiss-led team of archaeologists in Greece has made a spectacular find: the temple of Artemis, a famous open-air sanctuary of antiquity. 

Researchers have been looking for the sanctuary for more than a century. The site was found at the foot of the Paleoekklisies hill near the small fishing town of Amarynthos on the Greek island of Euboea. It’s about 10km from the place where the temple was wrongly thought to be located.

Since 2007, the search for the sanctuary has been led by Karl Reber, a professor at the Universty of Lausanne and director of the Swiss School of Archaeology in Athens. 

Researchers found parts of a massive wall dating back to the classical era, which they believe belongs to the stoa or portico built near the temple. 
Euboea or Evia (Greek: Εύβοια, Evvoia, Ancient Greek: Εὔβοια, Eúboia) is the second-largest Greek island in area and population, after Crete. The narrow Euripus Strait separates it from Boeotia in mainland Greece. In general outline it is a long and narrow island; it is about 180 kilometres (110 mi) long, and varies in breadth from 50 kilometres (31 mi) to 6 kilometres (3.7 mi). Its geographic orientation is from northwest to southeast, and it is traversed throughout its length by a mountain range, which forms part of the chain that bounds Thessaly on the east, and is continued south of Euboea in the lofty islands of Andros, Tinos and Mykonos.


It forms most of the regional unit of Euboea, which also includes Skyros and a small area of the Greek mainland.

Exploratory trenches were opened in Amarynthos in 2012, and the Swiss team brought to light a bigger part of the building. 

 Now, after also finding artefacts with inscriptions, they are sure that they have located the site of the Artemis Amarynthia, which was the end point of the annual procession of people from the once prosperous trading city of Eretrea, 10km away. 

They held a festival in honour of Artemis, the untameable goddess of hunting in Greek mythology. She was worshipped as the patron goddess of Amarynthos, which takes its name from an Eretrean man who was besotted by Artemis.

loading...

Artifacts that were discovered with inscriptions indicate that this is the site of Artemis Amarynthia; which was the end point of the annual procession of people from the once prosperous trading city of Eretrea; 10km away.  

The ancient civilization held a festival in honor of Artemis; who was the goddess of hunting in Greek mythology.  She was worshiped as the patron goddess of Amarynthos; which takes its name from an Eretrean man who was besotted with Artemis.
The upper gymnasium of ancient Eretria

Source/Bibliography/Photography

http://www.ancientencyclopedia.com
Euboea /juːˈbiːə/ is a transliteration from the Ancient Greek: Εύβοια, Euboia [eúboja], while Evia and Evvia reflect the Modern Greek pronunciation [ˈevia].
Edward Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, J.B. Bury, ed., Methuen, 1898 p. 6:390, footnote 69
https://en.wikipedia.org
Gregory, Timothy E.; Ševčenko, Nancy Patterson (1991). "Euboea". In Kazhdan, Alexander. The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 736–737. ISBN 978-0-19-504652-6.
https://www.swissinfo.ch
Lane Fox, Robin. Travelling Heroes (London: Penguin, 2008) passim
http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ElAnt/V1N2/powell
Thucydides: History of the Peloponnesian War. I 15.
John David Lewis. Nothing Less than Victory: Decisive Wars and the Lessons of History Princeton University Press, 25 jan. 2010 ISBN 1400834309 p 34
Lazenby, p. 248–253
Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium: The Decline and Fall (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996) p. 116

Δεν υπάρχουν σχόλια:

Δημοσίευση σχολίου

loading...

Popular Posts Of The Week

Top best cpc cpm ppc ad network for publisher

Αναγνώστες

Translate

loading...
...
loading...
---------------------------------------------------------------------------